Tuesday, August 29, 2006

'Bout time

Warren Jeffs has been caught.

Thursday, August 24, 2006

The Campaign to Free Thought

This thing has been in the works for some time, but time constraints had forced me to the unfortunate state in which I procrastinate furiously.

As all KoH readers know, our goal is to illuminate the effect that religion has upon the world's most impressionable people (aside from mimes), children. As is the case with much of the atheist community, we are disturbed that parents around the world are allowed to indoctrinate their children. But I will not go into that spiel now.

Brian Flemming's War On Easter inspired me to take this a step further, to actual activism. And so, in the infinite boredom that comes with being a nerd, I devised a scheme to do that:

The Campaign to Free Thought.

What you will see at that site is a window into the many documents I wrote up as directions for a grassroots organization. This group, which would be composed entirely of concerned teenagers, would seek to help children think for themselves.

And so, now that I am as bored as I was when I wrote those documents, I've decided to get back into gear. I'd like to ask this blog's readers to take a look at what's on that experimental page and give us feedback. Suggestions? Concerns? Criticisms? Please leave them as comments. Thank you.

Sunday, August 20, 2006

J. Moot

Harrison County is a very Christian place. Not all of it, mind you. There are those who don't believe, or believe less. But all in all, the community heads feel they have the people behind them. That's why they were surprised when they got sued.

When I say Christian, I mean Christian. I mean crosses everywhere, "God Loves You" type stuff littering the streets, and even a leather-bound pocket copy of "New Testament: Psalms Proverbs" in the women's bathroom of the Board of Education building.

Christian.


Most notably, the public high school of Harrison County, Bridgeport High, has a picture entitled "Head of Christ" publicly displayed on the wall next to the principal's office. This is why they were sued. The two civil liberties groups Americans United for Separation of Church and State and the West Virginia American Civil Liberties Union wanted the painting taken out of the public view. The Board of Education responded with venom, saying it would fight the lawsuit. The Board said it had the community behind it, and proceeded to fundraise tens of thousands of dollars.

Then, on a dark night, as both sides were preparing to wage legal war, the painting was stolen.




...Despite the theft, the legal battle will continue.

"We're all in uncharted water here," said Harrison County School superintendent Carl Friebel, "The most logical question is 'Now that the picture's gone, is it moot?'"

Nevertheless, there is hope. Multiple civil rights groups are stepping in for godless members of the community. Even so, the crusading Christians have raised about $150,000 for the lawsuit - several thousand of which were raised by students. The fact is, this community is not unanimous, and although in the minority, there are enough rational people in that town to make a difference.

Where there is division, there is weakness.

Where there is weakness, there is hope.



Source: Newsvine

Stellar, dude

So we've got a new planet to name. Nobody wants to call UB313 "Xena", because, of course, planets are named after mythical gods and goddesses; not TV characters. So, of course, we just have to fit UB313 into that pattern--mythical gods and goddesses--and the solution is simple:

Jesus.

Wednesday, August 16, 2006

If the Devil Existed, he Would be a Lot Like Bill O'Reilly

Yesterday evening I went to the video store and found a new section that I hadn't known even existed (no, not the porno section...get your mind out of the gutter!). It was the "special interest" section. Time for documentaries and foreign films. There's hope for Roanoke movie-renters yet!
So I rented out basically the whole section, including a documenary called "Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism". Maybe it has something to do with the fact I watched it alone at midnight, mid-summer or maybe I'm just pissed off easily, but before I knew it I was on a crusade to get everyone I know to stop watching the Fox news network or having anything to do with anything remotely related to Murdoch's news media empire. If I walk upstairs and the T.V is on a fox news shows, my family has quickly learned that there's hell to pay.
I mean, don't get me wrong - I've always known that Fox projects conservative points of view; but this took it to a whole new level - to the point where I'd almost consider suing them for calling themselves a "fair and balanced news" show. Between the inappropriate use of the journalistic technique "some people say" and the verbal attack of Jeremy Glick, I wonder how some force of the universe doesn't stop these people, somehow. Even if you don't agree (as many people don't) with Jeremy's ideas about politics, he didn't deserve to be yelled at and told to "shut up"; and "some people say" should never be used to hide behind majority political thinking.
So I'm taking this to the one place I know how to be most influential - the internet. I'm posting myspace bulletins, I'm sending e-mails, mostly in vain.
You know, at the same time I wonder why I care so much about something that affects me so little in the long run. I'm smart enough to know not to listen to them, so why do I care if they lie to other people?
One could almost argue that if they can't figure it out on their own, they deserve to be lied to.
I guess I'm just what my mother would call a "hippie liberal activist". Ah, well. We'll all get over it.
My high school newspaper has more journalistic integrity than Fox News. You can take that to the bank, too. I can't make anyone fight it, but I sure as hell know that everyone I know is going to at least hear about it.

Links:

Watch the movie trailer on YouTube.
Watch Jeremy Glick's interview on The O'Reilly Factor.



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